Vitamin Injections

B-12 Shots

Vitamin Injections

Vitamin B-12, also called cobalamin, is a water-soluble vitamin that is one of eight essential B vitamins. It helps maintain healthy nerve cells and red blood cells and is also needed to make DNA, the genetic material in all cells. B-12 is vital in keeping your body running in top condition. While B-12 is found naturally in a healthy diet, factors like stress or poor eating habits can lead to a deficiency. A B-12 deficiency can have serious negative effects on your body. Vitamin B-12 Injections are used for weight loss, healthy skin, reducing stress, energy booster, and more.

Cobalamin injection (vitamin shot) is used to treat and prevent a lack of vitamin B12 that may be caused by any of the following:

Pernicious anemia (lack of a natural substance needed to absorb vitamin B12 from the intestine); certain diseases, infections, or medications that decrease the amount of vitamin B12 absorbed from food; or a vegan diet (strict vegetarian diet that does not allow any animal products, including dairy products and eggs).

Lack of vitamin B12 may cause anemia (condition in which the red blood cells do not bring enough oxygen to the organs) and permanent damage to the nerves.

Cobalamin injection also may be given as a test to see how well the body can absorb vitamin B12. Cobalamin injection is in a class of medications called vitamins. Because it is injected straight into the bloodstream, it can be used to supply vitamin B12 to people who cannot absorb this vitamin through the intestine.

HOW SHOULD THIS MEDICINE BE USED?

Before using cobalamin injection:

Tell your doctor and pharmacist if you are allergic to cyanocobalamin injection, nasal gel, or tablets; hydroxocobalamin; multi-vitamins; any other medications or vitamins; or cobalt.

Tell your doctor and pharmacist what prescription and nonprescription medications, vitamins, nutritional supplements, and herbal products you are taking.

Be sure to mention any of the following: antibiotics such as chloramphenicol; colchicine; folic acid; methotrexate (Rheumatrex, Trexall); para-aminosalicylic acid (Paser); and pyrimethamine (Daraprim). Your doctor may need to change the doses of your medications or monitor you carefully for side effects.

Tell your doctor if you drink or have ever drunk large amounts of alcohol and if you have or have ever had Leber’s hereditary optic neuropathy (slow, painless loss of vision, first in one eye and then in the other) or kidney disease.

Tell your doctor if you are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding. If you become pregnant while using cobalamin injection, call your doctor. Talk to your doctor about the amount of vitamin B12 you should get every day when you are pregnant or breast-feeding.